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Chris McNulty > KnowPoint
January 20
SharePoint 2016 Release Candidate is out today

Good morning everyone!

Today, Microsoft announced the availability of Release Candidate for SharePoint 2016. This is just about the last public step prior to the final RTM build to be released before mid year. The RC should be installed as an update to Beta 2, so it shouldn't require a complete rebuild.

Great art lies within © 2016 Christopher F. McNulty also at Flickr

Microsoft has also committed to support its current tools for SharePoint Business application development – InfoPath and SharePoint Designer – until 2026. For more detail, please read Bill Baer's post. Thanks.

October 07
Honored to be joining Microsoft

Hi folks. For the past few years it's been a great honor to be a member of our fantastic community, and to be recognized as an MVP for SharePoint by Microsoft. This week, I'm greatly pleased to announce that I've joined Microsoft as Sr. Product Marketing Manager in the Office 365 team, working with Seth Patton. I'll be covering a number of workloads for SharePoint, including ECM, metadata, forms and workflow.

Bunny on campus © 2015 Christopher F. McNulty

My career with Microsoft information technologies has spanned several decades, more than a few products and a couple of firms. SharePoint and Office 365 have been at the forefront of my work for a while, but I've also spent a lot of time with SQL, Exchange, Project Server, Active Directory, VB and more. After working behind the scenes in global financial services firms like John Hancock and State Street, in the last decade KMA gave me the opportunity to lead our growing consulting practice for clients large and small throughout the US. KMA also allowed me to expand the scope of my technical presentations and writing to reach a national audience.

Joining Quest Software (and then Dell) was another fantastic leap. The ISV world is clearly different from consulting, and Quest was a hugely satisfying experience of product management and marketing. HiSoftware/Cryptzone gave me the chance to lead product and customer teams through private equity and M&A processes as we innovated a broad product portfolio. Ultimately, leaving Cryptzone was hard. However, as Cryptzone evolves beyond its Microsoft content management roots to focus on its next generation AppGate firewall product, I'm confident I'm leaving them with a bright future as well.

Three points I want to make:

  • First, my gracious thanks to everyone in the community (there are many) who have supported me during this transition. There's nothing like a tough decision to remind you of the support and friendship we have in this world. It's huge. I'm also lucky to be able to count so many colleagues as friends. And the support and commitment of my family has been tremendous.
  • Second, one of my requirements for this position was remaining active in the community. That won't change. You can expect I'll continue to be organizing, presenting, and writing about Office 365 and related topics – in this blog, books, and beyond.
  • Finally, I've worked hard to cultivate a reputation (I hope) for technical excellence and honest guidance. Joining Microsoft only expands that commitment. Sure, I can't tell you everything – but I've been under a Microsoft NDA for most of the past decade. Now, I have line of sight to the right resources to get answers to your ever evolving needs.

Thanks again, and I look forward to helping each of you do more with the solutions from this entire diverse community, and from Microsoft.

October 04
September 2015 SharePoint 2013 Cumulative Updates and Internal Version Numbers

Gosh, I've had a busy summer! With events in New York, London, Seattle, Las Vegas and many place in between, hard to believe there was ever a Little League baseball season in there too. Sorry its been so long to update this.

Once SharePoint 2016 is finally out next year this is going to get simpler, since there won't be a version of Foundation any longer. Wow, things are really shifting now that the Office 365 team is apparently relaxing its hiring standards. J (Small hint there.)

Puget Sound Sunset © 2015 Christopher F. McNulty

If you're new to SharePoint, Microsoft rolls up its patches into a consolidated update every month or so. Major functional changes are usually only made as part of a Service Pack. Service Pack 1 was released (after a few false starts) in early 2014 and added support for Yammer, OneDrive and selective JSON syntax for metadata retrieval.

The March 2013 Public Update and/or Service Pack 1 are considered pre-requisite "baselines" for subsequent CU's – later CUs won't install if they don't see the March PU out there. If you get a message about "a required version of this product could not be found on this system" – that's why. Install a baseline version first.

Also, please read the manifests of what's fixed. There are a lot of things fixed in the early months of a release, and not all the fixes are equally stabIe. It is NOT best practice to auto-deploy the CUs as soon as they're released. Make sure the update fixes your issue, or at least something close, and always test before going into production.

SharePoint CU's can take a long time to apply. You can accelerate the process by temporally disabling some other CPU-hungry processes like search during the patch process. You can find details in Russ Maxwell's post on TechNet.

SharePoint 2013 release numbers can be found similarly to how you find them in 2010 - just go to Central Admin | System Settings | Manage Servers In Farm. Or, in PowerShell, use:

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$spf = Get-SPFarm

Write-Output $spf.BuildVersion

 

For more information on SharePoint 2013 updates, please visit

http: https://technet.microsoft.com/library/dn789211(v=office.14)//technet.microsoft.com/en-US/office/ee748587

SharePoint 2013 Version/Release

Microsoft Support KB Reference

Version Number from Central Admin

Release Date

September 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2986213 / KB2975894

15.0.4753.1000

17 Sept 2015

August 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3055009 / KB3055004

15.0.4745.1001

11 Aug 2015

July 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3054937 / KB3054931

15.0.4737.1000

14 July 2015

June 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3054866 / KB3054864

15.0.4727.1001

9 June 2015

May 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3039780 / KB3039747

15.0.4719.1002

12 May 2015

April 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2965266 / KB2965261

15.0.4711.1000

14 April 2015

March 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2956166 / KB2956159

15.0.4701.1001

10 March 2015

Feb 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2920804 / KB2920801

15.0.4693.1001

10 February 2015

Dec 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2910938 / KB2910945

15.0.4675.1000

9 December 2014

Nov 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2889944 / KB2899468

15.0.4667.1000

11 November 2014

Sept 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2883068 / KB2883087

15.0.4649.1001

9 September 2014

July 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2882989 / KB2882999

15.0.4631.1001

8 July 2014

June 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2881061 / KB 2881063

15.0.4623.1001

10 June 2014

May 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2878240 / KB2863892

15.0.4605.1004

7 May 2014

April 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

No longer hosted

15.0.4605.1000

 

Service Pack SP1 (v2) Server/Foundation

KB2880552/KB2880551

 

15.0.4560.1000

22 April 2014

February 2013 Service Pack SP1 (Service Pack) Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

 

2817429 is the bad build/ 2817439

15.0.4560.1000

26 Feb 2014

December 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

15.0.4551.1511 / 15.0.4551.1508

10 December 2013

October 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2825647/KB2825674

15.0.4551.1005

26 October 2013

August 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817616/KB2817517

15.0.4535.1000

13 Aug 2013

June 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817414/KB2817346

15.0.4517.1005 / 15.0.4517.1003

26 June 2013

April 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2726992/KB2751999

15.0.4505.1002

9 April 2013

March 2013 Public Update Server/Foundation

KB2767999/KB2768000

15.0.4481.1005

12 March 2013

SharePoint 2013 RTM

 

15.0.4420.1017

11 October 2012

SharePoint 2013 Beta Refresh

 

15.0.4128.1022

September 2012

SharePoint 2013 Public Beta

 

15.0.4128.1024

16 July 2012

Tech Preview 2

 

14.0.6117.5002

April 2012

Tech Preview 1

 

15.0.3612.1010

February 2012

Wave 15 Private Beta

 

15.0.3612.1010

2011

  

August 08
July 2015 SharePoint 2013 Cumulative Updates and Internal Version Numbers

Well, its official – SharePoint 2016 will be entering pubic preview this month. It's going to have great support for integrating hybrid topologies. Hopefully better than th car-boat Amphicar hybrid.

Hybrid Car © 2015 Christopher F McNulty also on Flickr

If you're new to SharePoint, Microsoft rolls up its patches into a consolidated update every month or so. Major functional changes are usually only made as part of a Service Pack. Service Pack 1 was released (after a few false starts) in early 2014 and added support for Yammer, OneDrive and selective JSON syntax for metadata retrieval.

The March 2013 Public Update and/or Service Pack 1 are considered pre-requisite "baselines" for subsequent CU's – later CUs won't install if they don't see the March PU out there. If you get a message about "a required version of this product could not be found on this system" – that's why. Install a baseline version first.

Also, please read the manifests of what's fixed. There are a lot of things fixed in the early months of a release, and not all the fixes are equally stabIe. It is NOT best practice to auto-deploy the CUs as soon as they're released. Make sure the update fixes your issue, or at least something close, and always test before going into production.

SharePoint CU's can take a long time to apply. You can accelerate the process by temporally disabling some other CPU-hungry processes like search during the patch process. You can find details in Russ Maxwell's post on TechNet.

SharePoint 2013 release numbers can be found similarly to how you find them in 2010 - just go to Central Admin | System Settings | Manage Servers In Farm. Or, in PowerShell, use:

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$spf = Get-SPFarm

Write-Output $spf.BuildVersion

 

For more information on SharePoint 2013 updates, please visit

http: https://technet.microsoft.com/library/dn789211(v=office.14)//technet.microsoft.com/en-US/office/ee748587

SharePoint 2013 Version/Release

Microsoft Support KB Reference

Version Number from Central Admin

Release Date

July 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3054937 / KB3054931

15.0.4737.1000

14 July 2015

June 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3054866 / KB3054864

15.0.4727.1001

9 June 2015

May 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KKB3054866 / KB3054864B3039780 / KB3039740

15.0.4719.1002

12 May 2015

April 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2965266 / KB2965261

15.0.4711.1000

14 April 2015

March 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2956166 / KB2956159

15.0.4701.1001

10 March 2015

Feb 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2920804 / KB2920801

15.0.4693.1001

10 February 2015

Dec 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2910938 / KB2910945

15.0.4675.1000

9 December 2014

Nov 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2889944 / KB2899468

15.0.4667.1000

11 November 2014

Sept 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2883068 / KB2883087

15.0.4649.1001

9 September 2014

July 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2882989 / KB2882999

15.0.4631.1001

8 July 2014

June 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2881061 / KB 2881063

15.0.4623.1001

10 June 2014

May 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2878240 / KB2863892

15.0.4605.1004

7 May 2014

April 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

No longer hosted

15.0.4605.1000

 

Service Pack SP1 (v2) Server/Foundation

KB2880552/KB2880551

 

15.0.4560.1000

22 April 2014

February 2013 Service Pack SP1 (Service Pack) Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

 

2817429 is the bad build/ 2817439

15.0.4560.1000

26 Feb 2014

December 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

15.0.4551.1511 / 15.0.4551.1508

10 December 2013

October 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2825647/KB2825674

15.0.4551.1005

26 October 2013

August 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817616/KB2817517

15.0.4535.1000

13 Aug 2013

June 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817414/KB2817346

15.0.4517.1005 / 15.0.4517.1003

26 June 2013

April 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2726992/KB2751999

15.0.4505.1002

9 April 2013

March 2013 Public Update Server/Foundation

KB2767999/KB2768000

15.0.4481.1005

12 March 2013

SharePoint 2013 RTM

 

15.0.4420.1017

11 October 2012

SharePoint 2013 Beta Refresh

 

15.0.4128.1022

September 2012

SharePoint 2013 Public Beta

 

15.0.4128.1024

16 July 2012

Tech Preview 2

 

14.0.6117.5002

April 2012

Tech Preview 1

 

15.0.3612.1010

February 2012

Wave 15 Private Beta

 

15.0.3612.1010

2011

  

June 13
June 2015 SharePoint 2013 Cumulative Updates and Internal Version Numbers

Another quick update now that I'm back from Arizona.

Saguaro © 2015 Christopher F McNulty also on Flickr

If you're new to SharePoint, Microsoft rolls up its patches into a consolidated update every month or so. Major functional changes are usually only made as part of a Service Pack. Service Pack 1 was released (after a few false starts) in early 2014 and added support for Yammer, OneDrive and selective JSON syntax for metadata retrieval.

The March 2013 Public Update and/or Service Pack 1 are considered pre-requisite "baselines" for subsequent CU's – later CUs won't install if they don't see the March PU out there. If you get a message about "a required version of this product could not be found on this system" – that's why. Install a baseline version first.

Also, please read the manifests of what's fixed. There are a lot of things fixed in the early months of a release, and not all the fixes are equally stabIe. It is NOT best practice to auto-deploy the CUs as soon as they're released. Make sure the update fixes your issue, or at least something close, and always test before going into production.

SharePoint CU's can take a long time to apply. You can accelerate the process by temporally disabling some other CPU-hungry processes like search during the patch process. You can find details in Russ Maxwell's post on TechNet.

SharePoint 2013 release numbers can be found similarly to how you find them in 2010 - just go to Central Admin | System Settings | Manage Servers In Farm. Or, in PowerShell, use:

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$spf = Get-SPFarm

Write-Output $spf.BuildVersion

 

For more information on SharePoint 2013 updates, please visit

http: https://technet.microsoft.com/library/dn789211(v=office.14)//technet.microsoft.com/en-US/office/ee748587

SharePoint 2013 Version/Release

Microsoft Support KB Reference

Version Number from Central Admin

Release Date

June 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3054866 / KB3054864

15.0.4727.1001

9 June 2015

May 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB3039780 / KB3039740

15.0.4719.1002

12 May 2015

April 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2965266 / KB2965261

15.0.4711.1000

14 April 2015

March 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2956166 / KB2956159

15.0.4701.1001

10 March 2015

Feb 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2920804 / KB2920801

15.0.4693.1001

10 February 2015

Dec 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2910938 / KB2910945

15.0.4675.1000

9 December 2014

Nov 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2889944 / KB2899468

15.0.4667.1000

11 November 2014

Sept 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2883068 / KB2883087

15.0.4649.1001

9 September 2014

July 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2882989 / KB2882999

15.0.4631.1001

8 July 2014

June 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2881061 / KB 2881063

15.0.4623.1001

10 June 2014

May 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2878240 / KB2863892

15.0.4605.1004

7 May 2014

April 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

No longer hosted

15.0.4605.1000

 

Service Pack SP1 (v2) Server/Foundation

KB2880552/KB2880551

 

15.0.4560.1000

22 April 2014

February 2013 Service Pack SP1 (Service Pack) Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

 

2817429 is the bad build/ 2817439

15.0.4560.1000

26 Feb 2014

December 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

15.0.4551.1511 / 15.0.4551.1508

10 December 2013

October 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2825647/KB2825674

15.0.4551.1005

26 October 2013

August 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817616/KB2817517

15.0.4535.1000

13 Aug 2013

June 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817414/KB2817346

15.0.4517.1005 / 15.0.4517.1003

26 June 2013

April 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2726992/KB2751999

15.0.4505.1002

9 April 2013

March 2013 Public Update Server/Foundation

KB2767999/KB2768000

15.0.4481.1005

12 March 2013

SharePoint 2013 RTM

 

15.0.4420.1017

11 October 2012

SharePoint 2013 Beta Refresh

 

15.0.4128.1022

September 2012

SharePoint 2013 Public Beta

 

15.0.4128.1024

16 July 2012

Tech Preview 2

 

14.0.6117.5002

April 2012

Tech Preview 1

 

15.0.3612.1010

February 2012

Wave 15 Private Beta

 

15.0.3612.1010

2011

   

June 02
Microsoft Ignite, reexplained – SharePoint, Windows 10 and Office 365

Rather than just bringing you to the cloud, Microsoft also brings the cloud to you.

"Well, what have you learned, Dorothy?" – The Tin Woodsman

Sorry, but it's a worthwhile question to ask anytime you return from, or to, the Midwest. I spent five days (and nights) with about 23000 others at the inaugural Microsoft Ignite conference at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois.

Chicago - Home of Ignite 2015 and 2016 © 2016 Christopher F. McNulty

Microsoft has made a LOT of news lately across their Build and Ignite announcements. Windows 10 is the centerpiece of all their efforts. To quote CEO Satya Nadella,

"We're the only company that cares deeply about individual experiences and organizational solutions"

As we move from the BYOD wave to the Internet of Things (IOT), soon the number of devices will outstrip the number of people on the plant. And Microsoft has carved out an ambitious goal – over a billion Widows 10 devices, all of them able to run the same set of Universal Apps across smartphone, tablet and PC form factors. All driven by a mantra of "mobile first, cloud first". (Side note- that slogan always sounds like a tie – are both first?)

Microsoft's keynote announcements were grouped in three areas:

More personal computing

Along the theme of keeping users experiences consistent across a broad range of devices, Microsoft announced new versions of Windows Update for Business and System Center.

Reinvent productivity

Microsoft's unifying principle balances individual output and process controls. Some of the major investments ae in areas well beyond the traditional Word/Excel/PowerPoint arc with new paradigms like Sway, Cortana and Delve. Major announcements here include:

  • Office 2016 – support live coauthoring
  • Delve for Organization – new insights in collaboration patterns
  • Skype for Business
  • Cortana, the voice assistant, has been added to Windows 10 with support for Power BI
  • Exchange 2016
  • SharePoint 2016 (more below)

 

Build the intelligent cloud

Here's where Microsoft deploys major infrastructure support to unify cloud and premises systems:

  • Windows Server 2016
  • SQL 2016
  • Ops Management Center (control multiple clouds)
  • Advanced Threat Analytics
  • Azure Stack to allow on premises data servers to operate more as a private cloud of Azure services to support custom apps

     

As Brad Anderson, Corporate Vie President at Microsoft noted "Security is the #1 enterprise concern today." Consistent with what we've seen, 75% of data breaches come from weak credentials or compromised identity. And the risks are no longer about mischief or petty crime – real financial exposure, intellectual property theft and business disruption ae all part of the emerging threat landscape.

Microsoft's keynote demos were too numerous to cover in detail, but I had three favorites.

Windows 10 "Hello" uses cameras and face recognition to automatically identify you and log you into systems. Universal Apps will use one code base to run seamlessly across multiple devices and form factors, ensuring for example a consistent Outlook user experience on smartphones, tablets and traditional PCs. Finally, Delve for Organizations applies machine learning to the Office Graph to spotlight personal, team, and geographic patterns in enterprise collaboration – for example, which teams never meet with other teams and correspond mostly by email, etc.

Delve for Organizations

SharePoint and Office 365

SharePoint 2016 is coming, and it's going to be big.

Hybrid is already a huge part of the story – Cryptzone's own Office 365 survey published at Ignite noted that 76% of enterprises expect to run SharePoint in a hybrid topology permanently or indefinitely. There's lot of cloud adoption – and even on premises SharePoint continues to grow at a double digit annual rate.

To be fair, some of Microsoft's major announcements about SharePoint were made in the weeks before Ignite. Seth Patton, Sr. Director of Product Management at Microsoft, had announced in April that SharePoint 2016 would be moving to public beta in the fourth quarter of 2015, with a release data in Q2 of 2016. In addition, Microsoft announced new API support for tracking over 150 user and management activities in Office 365, as well as expanded support for using Azure RMS to encrypt sensitive data in Office 365.

For me, this was welcome news, since Cryptzone had already been working to bring the power of RMS into our products. At our booth, we even showcased a technology preview integrating RMS into our Site Sheriff product.

Fundamentally, SharePoint 2016 takes a different approach to coexistence with a hybrid cloud. Instead of forcing enterprises to move to the cloud to access new features, SharePoint 2016 allows enterprises to bring the best of the cloud down to an on premises farm, while continuing to use on premises SharePoint for content. Rather than just bringing you to the cloud, Microsoft also brings the cloud to you.

SharePoint 2016 will greatly expand core capacities from the 2013 version, with support for 10GB files, list view limits well about 5000 items, and content databases maximum sizes support well beyond 1TB.

In my opinion, Microsoft learned more about tuning and using SharePoint in their first month running Office 365 than in their first ten years of selling the on premises product. A lot of the infrastructure shifts are about sharing better understood patterns for deployment to the on premises world. Bill Baer, Microsoft's senior director of product management, spotlighted many of these changes:

  • Live telemetry and usage management dashboards to closely match what Microsoft uses internally to support and troubleshoot SharePoint Online. These screens are far more sophisticated than anything in the product to date.
  • Server installation will only install the specific bits needed for each servers "role" – web server, application server, cache server or custom application server, an approach called MinRole.
  • Simplification and streamlining of service database structures.
  • Live, zero downtime patching will be standard in SharePoint 2016.
  • New wizards to install and configure seamless access to cloud services and identity
  • A new unified search service application for 2016 (and also coming for SharePoint 2013) to allow on premises content to generate signals to be consumed by the Office Graph and Delve (more later.)
  • An update to Performance Point for on premises use.

 

In case you missed it, the Office Graph is a cloud based machine learning service that mines all you personal interaction with files, messages, email and other cloud services for patterns. Delve shows you the results for your own work, as well as what's going on around your teams, surfaced with "cards" to guide you to recent content.

And there's a slew of new things coming to Office 365 – most of which can be easily integrated on premises

  • NextGen Portals – Microsoft is rolling out ready to use toolsets tied closely to Office 365 and on premises. The video portal is already shipping, along with Delve. New support for people tracking, knowledge management and article publishing, and custom portals are al on tap for the next year or so.
  • Delve Boards -- with the new on premises search integration, Delve document boards will blend on premises signals with those form the cloud in the Office Graph.
  • Groups – allowing you to assemble a collaboration space with a site collection for documents, a common calendar and threaded discussion tied to email and stored through Exchange.
  • Search – Office 365 will be able to unify search results and ranking in one screen, combining on premises and cloud sources
  • Power BI – including a new dashboard pack to allow enterprises to visualize and monitor Office 365 usage and adoption.
  • New granular administrative roles in Office 365 will also let you define an administrator for just SharePoint, Exchange, Skype or Office alone.

     

And to be fair, some things are not being enhanced. InfoPath and SharePoint Designer 2013 are remaining as is in 2016, with no new versions being released. The free, low end SharePoint Foundation server is also not being refreshed for SharePoint 2016. Support for AppFabric and Forefront is also being reduced.

Finally, Yammer was conspicuous by its absence in the Ignite keynotes. There were no new, compelling stories about Yammer for enterprise collaboration as Microsoft shifted a lot of its Ignite focus to Groups.

What does it all mean?

Microsoft is not backing away from its commitment to a cloud first approach. Office 365 will remain Microsoft's first hub for innovation and collaboration for the years to come.

However, SharePoint 2016 represents an honest assessment that on-premises usage is also a permanent part of our collaboration fabric. Microsoft's hybrid innovations can ease the forced pressure to "move everything to the cloud". In truth, you're going to be able to sustain an on premises environment, probably forever.

If governance is in part, about establishing business outcomes and matching the technology and process to support the goals, SharePoint 2016 and Office 365 are a prime case. There are certain workloads like SQL Reporting Services or full trust code that are well suited to running on premises. Other aspects of collaboration, like Delve or Power BI, belong in the cloud, while team sites could run in either mode.

I thin SharePoint 2016, in the end, is about engaging the cloud in your own terms, rather than having Microsoft dictate them.

And Microsoft is no longer trying to be all things to all people. Instead, SharePoint 2016 represents double down and expanding their own R&D investment on for core aspects for collaboration:

  • Files
  • Sites
  • Portals
  • Content Management


The message is to focus on what SharePoint does better than anything else – collaboration.

There's a lot to take in. I haven't even mentioned my own Ignite sessions on RBS, enterprise content management and the MVP panel Q&A. But these sessions and more were all recorded and available to watch free of charge at http://ignite.microsoft.com

Finally, if you think there was a lot this year-- you're right. That's why Microsoft will be bringing Ignite back to Chicago again next year, May 9-14, 2016. See you then.

May 03
My Pre Ignite 2015 Summary

I'm posting this while I'm in final preparations for Microsoft's Ignite conference May 4-8, 2015 at the McCormick Place in Chicago. If you can't make it, don't worry – many of the sessions including Satya Nadella's keynote, will be streaming online. I'm looking forward to hearing more about Office 365, Azure, and Windows 10.

Sessions

I'm also honored to be able to present three sessions at Ignite:

Thursday 10:45am E351
MVP Panel: SharePoint On-Premises, Online and Everything in Between
This is being co-presented with my friends Dan Holme, Christian Buckley, Laura Rogers, and Jennifer Mason. Please come and help me understand why they even let me on the same panel with such noteworthy MVPs. For more details, check out my YouTube preview.

Friday 9:00AM S404
Elastic SharePoint Storage with StorSimple and Microsoft Azure
This will be a deep dive into how StorSimple and Microsoft Azure work together to assure nearly limitless storage for content. I'll be reviewing the principles of RBS and shredded storage used by SharePoint.

Friday 10:45AM E451B
Advanced enterprise content management and classification in SharePoint on-premises and Office 365
"With big data comes big responsibility, and in Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365, document metadata and ECM provide the answer. This session covers metadata best practices to establish and enforce precise classification and management of your documents. We narrow in on principal uses for managed terms and content types and apply them to documents using rules based content organizers, records management, eDiscovery and retention policy. The session also covers the latest capabilities for information classification and usage in SharePoint 2016." Lots of demos for this one.

Cryptzone

I know my blog is ad-free – but wanted to give some guidance about what my company is going at Ignite. We've got a broad slate of activities scheduled – a full calendar is posted on our Cryptzone Insights blog. We're at booth 551, and I'll have daily office hours from 2-4pm if you need to meet up.

If I'm NOT at the booth, they're looping a giant talking head video of me talking about Office 365. Kinda spooky. Probably more fun is picking up a copy of our new mascot, #Crypto the dog. Best picture this week with the hashtag #wherescrypto wins a prize.

More than one way to win! #wherescrypto

Plus, Monday night I'll be at the Cryptzone booth giving away copies of my book, the "SharePoint 2013 Consultant's Handbook" for the first 100 folks who swing by.

 

Afterhours

Officially, the Hyatt Chicago Magnificent Mile has been designated as the place to meetup for the entire Office team (including SharePoint and Office 365) Sunday-Wednesday. We're also sponsoring the Best of Breed Party Tuesday night at the House of Blues at 9pm (register here) plus some of the impromptu semi-official SharePints on Monday and Thursday. The best source of information on all the events is probably Vlad CATRINESCU'S POST AT http://sharepoint-community.net/profiles/blogs/the-ultimate-microsoft-ignite-party-list

Edward Hopper's Nighthawks at the Art Institute of Chicago

If you've never been to Chicago – I'm jealous. The Navy Per, the Art Institute, Giordano's, the Magnificent Mile, the Tribune, the River/Loop – so much to see and explore. Have fun!

Calder's Flamingo at the Chicago Federal Building © 2013 Cristopher F. McNulty and on Flickr

May 02
April 2015 SharePoint 2013 Cumulative Updates and Internal Version Numbers

Short and sweet this time – deep in the midst of preparation for Ignite. Just a quick glimpse of our long delayed Opening Day for Little League, and relief that winter is no longer coming (although there's still a 15 foot snow mountain in the ball field parking lot!)

 

Spring at Last © 2015 Christopher F McNulty also on Flickr

If you're new to SharePoint, Microsoft rolls up its patches into a consolidated update every month or so. Major functional changes are usually only made as part of a Service Pack. Service Pack 1 was released (after a few false starts) in early 2014 and added support for Yammer, OneDrive and selective JSON syntax for metadata retrieval.

The March 2013 Public Update and/or Service Pack 1 are considered pre-requisite "baselines" for subsequent CU's – later CUs won't install if they don't see the March PU out there. If you get a message about "a required version of this product could not be found on this system" – that's why. Install a baseline version first.

Also, please read the manifests of what's fixed. There are a lot of things fixed in the early months of a release, and not all the fixes are equally stabIe. It is NOT best practice to auto-deploy the CUs as soon as they're released. Make sure the update fixes your issue, or at least something close, and always test before going into production.

SharePoint CU's can take a long time to apply. You can accelerate the process by temporally disabling some other CPU-hungry processes like search during the patch process. You can find details in Russ Maxwell's post on TechNet.

SharePoint 2013 release numbers can be found similarly to how you find them in 2010 - just go to Central Admin | System Settings | Manage Servers In Farm. Or, in PowerShell, use:

Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$spf = Get-SPFarm

Write-Output $spf.BuildVersion

 

For more information on SharePoint 2013 updates, please visit

http: https://technet.microsoft.com/library/dn789211(v=office.14)//technet.microsoft.com/en-US/office/ee748587

SharePoint 2013 Version/Release

Microsoft Support KB Reference

Version Number from Central Admin

Release Date

April 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2965266 / KB2965261

15.0.4711.1000

14 April 2015

March 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2956166 / KB2956159

15.0.4701.1001

10 March 2015

Feb 2015 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2920804 / KB2920801

15.0.4693.1001

10 February 2015

Dec 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2910938 / KB2910945

15.0.4675.1000

9 December 2014

Nov 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2889944 / KB2899468

15.0.4667.1000

11 November 2014

Sept 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2883068 / KB2883087

15.0.4649.1001

9 September 2014

July 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2882989 / KB2882999

15.0.4631.1001

8 July 2014

June 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2881061 / KB 2881063

15.0.4623.1001

10 June 2014

May 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2878240 / KB2863892

15.0.4605.1004

7 May 2014

April 2014 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

No longer hosted

15.0.4605.1000

 

Service Pack SP1 (v2) Server/Foundation

KB2880552/KB2880551

 

15.0.4560.1000

22 April 2014

February 2013 Service Pack SP1 (Service Pack) Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

 

2817429 is the bad build/ 2817439

15.0.4560.1000

26 Feb 2014

December 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2850024/KB2849961

15.0.4551.1511 / 15.0.4551.1508

10 December 2013

October 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2825647/KB2825674

15.0.4551.1005

26 October 2013

August 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817616/KB2817517

15.0.4535.1000

13 Aug 2013

June 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2817414/KB2817346

15.0.4517.1005 / 15.0.4517.1003

26 June 2013

April 2013 Cumulative Update Server/Foundation

KB2726992/KB2751999

15.0.4505.1002

9 April 2013

March 2013 Public Update Server/Foundation

KB2767999/KB2768000

15.0.4481.1005

12 March 2013

SharePoint 2013 RTM

 

15.0.4420.1017

11 October 2012

SharePoint 2013 Beta Refresh

 

15.0.4128.1022

September 2012

SharePoint 2013 Public Beta

 

15.0.4128.1024

16 July 2012

Tech Preview 2

 

14.0.6117.5002

April 2012

Tech Preview 1

 

15.0.3612.1010

February 2012

Wave 15 Private Beta

 

15.0.3612.1010

2011

   

    

May 01
Quick tip on sharing Managed Metadata across site collections

This is a relatively simple but obscure tip. SharePoint 2013 defines most term groups to live inside a given site collection. However, you may need to access a "master" copy of a group of term sets from a different collection. If you go to the "far" collection, by default you won't see the term set. Hmm. You can see keywords, and other global term sets, but not those scoped to a single site collection

Since MMS is shareable across multiple farms, shouldn't you be able to get to any site collection terms set groups in the MMS (Managed Metadata Service) SSA (Shared Services Application)? Yes, but you have to turn it on. When you highlight the "root" of the site collection in Term Store Management:

The opening tab, at the bottom of its screen, lets you add the URLs to the site collections that are allowed read access to the term set children.

Save and you're done. Those site collections obviously need to live in a web application that uses the same MMS SSA or its proxy. Easy – but if you don't linger on the root tab for a site collection SSA, you may never notice it.

April 29
SharePoint 2013 true or false?  1 or 2?  Where are my Web Parts ????

True or false – we like SharePoint to keep our web parts on the page. (Hint: True)

Cloud Gate in Chicago © 2014 Christopher F. McNulty

If you've updated SharePoint 2013 over the years, you may uncover random pages where Web parts have disappeared, replaced by the cryptic

true,false,1

Or false,false,2 or any other variation of this. The problem seems to be traced to versions of SharePoint between April 2014 SP1 and July 2014 CU. (The number is always the number of columns in the page layout). Several solutions are known:

  • Update to July 2014 CU or greater.
  • Shutdown and restart Managed Metadata services (I hate this one, it has more potential to do damage than I like.)
  • Check out the offending page and then discard checkout. This one seems to work all the time and hasn't shown any side effects.

And if you haven't guessed from the photo above, getting ramped up for Microsoft Ignite next week in Chicago! I'll be presenting three sessions:

MVP Panel: SharePoint On-Premises, Online and Everything in Between

Elastic SharePoint Storage with StorSimple and Microsoft Azure

Advanced enterprise content management and classification in SharePoint on-premises and Office 365

Plus, Monday night I'll be at the Cryptzone booth giving away copies of my book, the "SharePoint 2013 Consultant's Handbook" (not the preview edition anymore!) See you there!

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Chris McNulty offers technical and practical experience for the Microsoft knowledge worker -- especially SharePoint, Office 365, Yammer, SQL, and Project Server.

 

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